Recipients 2017

Karl Salzmann
Recipient of the Erste Bank ExtraVALUE Art Award

endowed with 3,000 euros, a one-month stay in New York and a presentation at the Austrian Cultural Forum from June 28 to September 03, 2017

Jury Statement
The jury decided in favour of Karl Salzmann and his presentation concept, titled Monopulism, which uses several components to create a performative (sound) installation. The jury was convinced by the installation’s reference to the current political situation, as revealed in the fascinating metaphorical quality of the individual set pieces.  In a windowless exhibition space, the central placement of a Loudspeaker Monument summons the image of a totalitarian societal structure oriented on a voice. A bar at the entrance serves as a metaphor for shallow chitchat and for repression, as two robotic vacuum cleaners perform their function, in apparent acceptation of their subordinate role. Broken microphones represent the silencing of opposition voices, while the sounds of David Hasselhoff singing Looking for Freedom suggest an American dream that has drifted far afield. Even the apparent beauty of Salzmann’s pictorial works titled Detonation reveals itself within the context of the entire installation to be an immediately threatening force. Given the post-factual, present-day USA, Karl Salzmann’s (sound) installation has particular relevance. In addition, it is, in general, a powerful statement on the themes of abuse of power, manipulation and repression.


Nika Kupyrova
Recipient of the Erste Bank ExtraVALUE Art Award

endowed with 1.500 euros and a solo-exhibition in das weisse haus – expected in winter 2017/2018

Jury Statement
On the recommendation of the jury, the Erste Bank ExtraVALUE Art Award endowed with 1.500 Euros and including a solo exhibition in das weisse haus, has been presented to Nika Kupyrova. The examination of gestures and gestural action that was designed for New York can certainly be developed in a convincing manner that is pertinent to the spatial situation in das weisse haus. The horizon of gestural activity ranges from children’s games to the kneading of dough to the conjuring of crystal balls, extending from innocent, ritualized gestures to functional and even manipulative action, and thus is related, in our day of do-it-yourselfism, to promises of salvation and reactionary escapism.